The latest news from many resources for American Baptist Churches.

World Mission Conference Live Stream

The World Mission Conference is coming to you through five 30 minute Live Stream events on July 14, 16, 21, 23 & 28 at 6:00pm Eastern time.

Join us for life-changing storytelling and the latest news and testimonies from IM’s global servants, who will help you see with 20/20 vision that God’s mission is alive and well around the world.

20/20 Vision
I once was blind, but now I see. Mark 8:22-25

We’re so excited that some American Baptist Churches will be hosting a Live Stream Watch Party. What a terrific way to help others catch the vision of what God is doing around the world! 

When we ask people what is the biggest highlight of attending a World Mission Conference, the number one answer is meeting the missionaries. For over 65 years, people have come to the World Mission Conference to get the latest stories fresh from the mission field, ask questions and really get to know the missionaries they support. That is what you will experience in these Live Stream events.  

17 global servants will be sharing how God is enabling them or the people they serve to see more clearly in 2020 through their diverse ministries. You’ll hear from development workers, missionaries, regional and global consultants based in Japan, the Dominican Republic, New Zealand, the United States, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Bolivia, Thailand, Haiti and India. And there will be opportunities for you to ask them questions. 

Church Watch Parties can register by providing the name and address of the church, and an email address so we can send you the YouTube link for the Live Stream. More details are available at https://www.internationalministries.org/category/events/ .

2021 Biennial Mission Summit Planning Underway!

Planning is well underway for the American Baptist Churches USA 2021 Biennial Mission Summit to be held June 25-27, 2021, at the San Juan Convention Center in San Juan, Puerto Rico. In a new video, Interim General Secretary Dr. C. Jeff Woods introduces and gives an update on planning for the event. We encourage you to watch the full video to learn more about the 2021 Biennial Mission Summit.

Acts of Racial Injustice by Dr. C. Jeff Woods


VALLEY FORGE, PA (ABNS 5/29/20)—On May 29, 2020, Interim General Secretary Dr. C. Jeff Woods published a letter to American Baptists with a message centered around justice and more specifically, racial justice. Read the letter below. 

Dear American Baptists,

The death of George Floyd has caused widespread pain, rage, protests, and violence in Minneapolis and across the United States. I appreciate the input received from officers of the Regional Executive Ministers Council, members of the National Executive Council, and others in constructing a response to this event. While American Baptists have never advocated violence, we grieve with those feeling the pent-up pain from years of racial discrimination and injustice. The horrifying video captured at the corner of Chicago Avenue and 38th Street in Minneapolis has released years of frustration that can never be fully understood by those who have not consistently lived with injustice historically and presently.

Acts of current racial injustice as well as the effects of historic racial injustices have been brought into the light in recent weeks as we recognize that African-Americans have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. In a recent study, the Centers for Disease Control found that 45% of individuals for whom race or ethnicity data was available were white, compared to 55% of individuals in the surrounding community and that 33% of hospitalized patients were black compared to 18% in the community. Unequal access to healthcare, jobs, education, and training have all been influenced by the racialized society in which we continue to live.

Unfortunately, acts of violence have been cast upon many ethnically distinct groups within our congregations and among our international partners. Many Chinese as well as Asian-Americans are being targeted, harassed, and even physically attacked because of comments made about COVID-19. In Malaysia, we are hearing reports of the government using information collected from the treatment of persons affected by COVID-19 for deportation despite earlier statements that no one who sought medical services for the coronavirus would be arrested based on their immigration status.

Racism and Xenophobia have deep roots in American history and culture and wrongs cannot be righted overnight. While expeditious action is critical to the pursuit of justice for George Floyd, dialogue, conversation, systemic change, and continued acts of justice to curb the sources of prejudice and discrimination are needed.

In these tense times of ache and agony and stinging memories of bias and wrongdoing, we are called again to combat racism and resist violence. American Baptists have historically advocated against both violence as well as racial injustice. “Our denominational history is rich with resistance against violence. From Roger Williams speaking in defense of First Nations People, to the Abolitionists, down to Walter Rauschenbusch, and Martin Luther King, American Baptists in particular have been on the forefront for the cessation of violence and the coming of Shalom.” (American Baptist Case Statement on Violence from the 2015 Mission Table). I am calling on people of faith to find the resources of the Spirit to calm their anger. “Lead a life worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love, making every effort to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.” (Ephesians 4:1-3, NASV)

Our denominational history is also rich in working toward justice in general and racial justice in particular. “Racial justice,” as defined in our 1989 ABCUSA policy statement, “is recognizing our oneness in Christ, confessing that we have not become what God wants us to be, and committing ourselves to pressing on to that mark of high calling by which we can become a liberating symbol to our nation and world of what it means to be the people of God. In so doing, we can challenge our nation to live up to its high purposes.”

“Thus says the Lord: Stand at the crossroads, and look, and ask for the ancient paths, where the good way lies; and walk in it, and find rest for your souls.” (Jeremiah 6:16, NASV) I charge our American Baptist family to continue to search, advocate, and live where the good way lies.

Dr. C. Jeff Woods
Interim General Secretary
American Baptist Churches USA

What Comes Next? Meeting the Challenges of Ministry in this Pandemic

April 27, 2020

Dear Friends,

We have been so blessed and encouraged by the creative and meaningful ways that pastors and congregations have responded to the challenges of ministry through this time of pandemic and quarantine. About 85 percent of ABC Ohio congregations have shared weekly electronic worship services that have included good preaching, prayer, and music. A number of churches have developed prayer and communication groups online, by phone or by email to be sure that their church families are cared for personally and spiritually. Pastors and others have made thousands of telephone calls to check on, reassure, pray with, and stay connected to their congregations. Since Easter, many of our congregations have begun to ask the question, “What comes next?”

Our Governor has announced in the past week that he would like to see the state begin to open up SLOWLY. We believe SLOWLY is an important word as the church prepares for what comes next. As much as we want to be together, the rush to make a hasty return to our previous ways could be disastrous for our congregations. Ken Braddy, Jr., a Sunday School specialist, has developed a series of questions church leaders should answer before they begin to set a date for the church to gather again in person. We recommend that your church consider some similar questions…

Read more: What Comes Next? Meeting the Challenges of Ministry in this Pandemic